Git Git Tagging


Introduction

Like most Version Control Systems (VCSs), Git has the ability to tag specific points in history as being important. Typically people use this functionality to mark release points (v1.0, and so on).

Syntax

  • git tag [-a | -s | -u < keyid >] [-f] [-m < msg > | -F < file >] < tagname > [< commit > | < object >]

  • git tag -d < tagname​ >

  • git tag [-n[< num >]] -l [--contains < commit >] [--contains < commit >] [--points-at < object >] [--column[=< options >] | --no-column] [--create-reflog] [--sort=< key >] [--format=< format >] [--[no-]merged [< commit >]] [< pattern >…​]

  • git tag -v [--format=< format >] < tagname >…​

Listing all available tags

Using the command git tag lists out all available tags:

$ git tag
<output follows>
v0.1
v1.3

Note: the tags are output in an alphabetical order.

One may also search for available tags:

$ git tag -l "v1.8.5*"
<output follows>
v1.8.5
v1.8.5-rc0
v1.8.5-rc1
v1.8.5-rc2
v1.8.5-rc3
v1.8.5.1
v1.8.5.2
v1.8.5.3
v1.8.5.4
v1.8.5.5

Create and push tag(s) in GIT

Create a tag:

  • To create a tag on your current branch:

    git tag < tagname >
    

    This will create a local tag with the current state of the branch you are on.

  • To create a tag with some commit:

    git tag tag-name commit-identifier
    

    This will create a local tag with the commit-identifier of the branch you are on.

Push a commit in GIT:

  • Push an individual tag:

    git push origin tag-name
    
  • Push all the tags at once

    git push origin --tags