react-nativeComponents

Basic Component

import React, { Component } from 'react'
import { View, Text, AppRegistry } from 'react-native'

class Example extends Component {
  render () {
    return (
      <View> 
        <Text> I'm a basic Component </Text>
      </View>
    )
  }
}

AppRegistry.registerComponent('Example', () => Example)

Stateful Component

These components will have changing States.

import React, { Component } from 'react'
import { View, Text, AppRegistry } from 'react-native'

class Example extends Component {
  constructor (props) {
    super(props)
    this.state = {
      name: "Sriraman"
    }  
  }
  render () {
    return (
      <View>
        <Text> Hi, {this.state.name}</Text>
      </View>
    )
  }
}

AppRegistry.registerComponent('Example', () => Example)

Stateless Component

As the name implies, Stateless Components do not have any local state. They are also known as Dumb Components. Without any local state, these components do not need lifecycle methods or much of the boilerplate that comes with a stateful component.

Class syntax is not required, you can simply do const name = ({props}) => ( ... ). Generally stateless components are more concise as a result.

Beneath is an example of two stateless components App and Title, with a demonstration of passing props between components:

import React from 'react'
import { View, Text, AppRegistry } from 'react-native'

const Title = ({Message}) => (
  <Text>{Message}</Text>
)    

const App = () => (
  <View>
    <Title title='Example Stateless Component' />
  </View>
)

AppRegistry.registerComponent('App', () => App)

This is the recommended pattern for components, when possible. As in the future optimisations can be made for these components, reducing memory allocations and unnecessary checks.